Advancement in pharmaceutical research- application of nanotechnology for therapeutic platforms in disease management

Nanoparticles used to deliver targeted ED drugs
Nanoparticles "smaller than a grain of pollen" have been made to carry minute quantities of therapeutics for erectile dysfunction, effectively delivering the drug directly through the skin in animal models. The oral drugs are related with a number of side effects, including blurred vision and upset stomachs. Men who have suffered a heart attack, meanwhile, are prevented from getting the ED drugs at all. But the researchers found that a locally applied topical solution was effective without side effects in rodents. ED drugs have been prominent best-sellers and an improved approach could also prove to be highly profitable.

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Nanomaterials used to fix neuron damage
Northwestern University researcher Samuel Stupp has presented the results of a study in which he injected nanomaterials into the severed spinal cords of mice, allowing them to walk again after several weeks of therapy. The nanomaterials he used were designed to self-assemble into nanofibers which repaired damaged neurons. The research offers new insights into the near-term research potential of nanotechnology and offers hope for patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's who suffer from severe neuron damage.

"Regenerating bone and cartilage are our first targets," Stupp told the Chicago Tribune. "That would be very important to Baby Boomers who value their quality of life. We are also working with regenerating blood vessels to address damage from heart attacks. (Nanotechnology) will first aid in diagnosing illness, but it also will provide therapies to alleviate or cure." 
We warmly welcome you to attend “International Conference on Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy (Biomedicine 2018), to be held Sep 20-22, 2018 at Frankfurt, Germany.

To know more visit our website: https://goo.gl/56ajNe 

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