Does Blood or marrow transplantation survivors have a higher risk of cognitive impairment?

Allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation recipients are at a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment in the years post-transplantation, according to the latest research work published. This study helps add a missing piece to a long-unsolved puzzle about post-transplant effects on recipients, specifically that vulnerable subpopulation of similar transplants can benefit from targeted interventions in the years after they receive their lifesaving treatment. While it has been studied that cognitive impairment after myeloablative allogeneic BMT can occur, it has been unclear if similar impacts to cognitive functioning occur after reduced-intensity allogeneic or after autologous BMT. This cognitive function deficit impacts areas of a survivor's life ranging from societal integration to their return to work, as well as a decline in memory, learning, attention, and concentration. With this research from our longitudinal prospective assessment, they are able to deduce that a significant population of allogeneic BMT survivors will experience cognitive impairment that can and will impact different aspects of their lives moving forward, And it's critical that we as clinicians develop interventions for these patients. This research is the just beginning of our figuring out how we can best care for BMT survivors and enable them to live healthy lives.

Between 2004 and 2014, 477 patients treated with BMT at City of Hope underwent standardized neuropsychological testing before their transplant, and at the six-month and one-, two- and three-year marks after transplant; testing was conducted on eight cognitive domains, including executive function, verbal fluency and speed, processing speed, working memory, visual and auditory memory, and fine motor dexterity. In addition, 99 healthy patients underwent identical testing as a benchmark for cognitive function.

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In analyzing the data, at three years post-transplant, evidence of cognitive impairment was present in 35.7 percent of allogeneic recipients. Furthermore, 38 percent of allogeneic recipients who participated at the three-year mark had not yet returned to work, and impairment was associated with a tenfold increased odds of not returning to work at three years post-transplant.

2nd International Conference on Hematology and OncologyLondon UK | August23-25, 2018To Know More: https://goo.gl/sgggAe

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